Domestic Violence Resources

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Domestic violence and emotional abuse are behaviors used by one person in a relationship to control the other. Partners may be married or not married; heterosexual, gay, or lesbian; living together, separated or dating.

Examples of Abuse Include

  • Name-Calling or Putdowns
  • Keeping a Partner From Contacting Their Family or Friends
  • Withholding Money
  • Stopping a Partner From Getting or Keeping a Job
  • Actual or Threatened Physical Harm
  • Sexual Assault
  • Stalking
  • Intimidation

Violence can be criminal and includes physical assault (hitting, pushing, shoving, etc.), sexual abuse (unwanted or forced sexual activity), and stalking. Although emotional, psychological and financial abuse are not criminal behaviors, they are forms of abuse and can lead to criminal violence.

The violence takes many forms and can happen all the time or once in a while. An important step to help yourself or someone you know in preventing or stopping violence is recognizing the warning signs listed on the "Violence Wheel."

Anyone Can Be a Victim!

Victims can be of any age, sex, race, culture, religion, education, employment or marital status. Although both men and women can be abused, most victims are women. Children in homes where there is domestic violence are more likely to be abused and/or neglected. Most children in these homes know about the violence. Even if a child is not physically harmed, they may have emotional and behavior problems.

If You Are Being Abused, Remember

  1. You are not alone
  2. It is not your fault
  3. Help is available

If you are in immediate danger, call 911

Resources

Police Service

Police officers will come out to your house any time, day or night, to investigate, counsel, intervene or arrest those committing domestic violence. If you need a police officer to respond, call 911 for help. The police officer will come in your house even over the objection of your partner, talk to you in a safe place away from your partner and not leave until, if necessary, you can get to a safe place. In some cases, an arrest will be made and a report will be taken. The officer will giver their name and report number, and provide a crisis resource card. If needed, the officer will assist with obtaining an emergency protective order so that you are safe from your aggressor.

Domestic Violence Restraining Order

A domestic violence restraining order is an order that helps protect you from someone who is abusive. It may contain orders telling that person what they cannot do to you. It may also have orders that tell that person to stay a certain distance away from you.

To get a restraining order, you must complete an application and provide information on who the person you want restrained. If there have been police reports taken, provide the report numbers, incident dates, times, places. The more specific you can be, the better. You will have to appear before the judge who may have questions about your application. The judge will made the final decision of whether the order is granted or not. Once the order has been granted and the restrained person has been served, it is entered into the police computer systems. If the person violates the restraining order, they may be arrested and charged with a crime.

Sexual Assault Domestic Violence Center

Provides services to victims/survivors of domestic violence. Also provides crisis intervention and counseling, assistance with restraining orders, and court accompaniment. Offers referrals to community organizations that provide legal services, shelter, and counseling. The Center is located at 175 Walnut Street in Woodland. Business telephone number is (530) 661-6336. 24-Hour Crisis Line: (916) 371-1907 or (530) 662-1133.

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